Wednesday, March 28, 2018

6th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, May 3rd at 5:30



Dark Matter: Origins, Evidence and Why you Should Care

Russell TerBeek, Ph.D.
Physicist
Raytheon Albuquerque
As we look out into the night sky, it is tempting to think that the universe as we see it, as vast and magnificent as it is, could not possibly be any stranger.  But, back in the 1970s, physicists and astronomers began to suspect that all we could see couldn’t possibly be all there was.  In order to explain the behavior of galaxies, and even clusters of galaxies, some kind of stuff that clumped together and yet didn’t emit light – “dark matter” – needed to be thrown into the picture.  In fact, in order to fit the observational data, about four-fifths of all the matter in the universe would need to be “dark.”  For tonight’s talk, I’ll discuss the history of dark matter in astronomy, the ongoing search to find it on both astronomical and microscopic scales, some of the theories of what could make up this mysterious form of matter, and the experimental evidence so far.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018


6th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, April 5th at 5:30


Afraid of Complex Environmental Systems? Surface Science: A New Hope



Investigation of environmental systems is often complex due to the simultaneous interaction of physical, chemical, and biological processes. However, most of these processes happen at the interface of water and solids which offer an opportunity to integrate conventional water chemistry techniques with advanced surface science tools. This conversation intends to motivate students and the general audience to recognize the invaluable opportunities that surface science tools offer to advance the current knowledge about the fate and transport of chemicals of concern in environmental systems.

Dr. Jose M. Cerrato

Assistant Professor

Department of Civil Engineering, UNM





Dr. Cerrato’s research interest is related to biogeochemical processes at the interface of water and energy that affect the cycle of metals and radionuclides in the environment. He leads the E-H2O Research Group which applies spectroscopy, microscopy, aqueous chemistry, and molecular biology tools for the study of complex environmental interactions.  Dr. Cerrato was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Washington University in St. Louis. He has been a recipient of the OAS-LASPAU-Fulbright Scholarship, National Science Foundation (NSF) Integrative Graduate Education Research Traineeship (IGERT), Oak Ridge Associated Universities Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award, the University of New Mexico Faculty of Color Research Award, and the NSF CAREER Award. 

In conjunction with the NMAVS Southwest Student Chapter

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

6th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, March 1st at 5:30


2 Presentations from Explora's Science Communication Fellows

Soil fungi may benefit both plants and biocrusts in drylands
 
Dr. Eva Dettweiler-Robinson
Research Assistant Professor
Department of Biology, UNM
 Drylands, such as those across New Mexico, have plants and biological soil crusts (mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, fungi, bacteria, etc.) living together. Plants and many components of biocrusts are photosynthetic, meaning they can use CO2 from the air to produce their bodies. Many biocrusts can also fix nitrogen from the air which is an important fertilizer. I am researching how fungi affect the rate of nitrogen transfer between biocrusts and plants and the overall effect on the performance of plants and biocrusts. Understanding these processes can help us understand what leads to erosion and windstorms, provide habitat for animals, and understand implications of climate change in drylands.

Albuquerque groundwater aquifer & its response to water resource management
 
Lucas Curry
Hydrologist
New Mexico Water Science Center
US Geological Survey


Wednesday, January 17, 2018

6th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, February 1st at 5:30



Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

Greg Mello
Executive Director 
Los Alamos Study Group
The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons was finalized and adopted by 122 states at a special United Nations negotiating Conference on July 7, 2017. The Treaty opened for signature on September 20, 2017; by week's end there were 54 signatory states. On October 6 it was announced that the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize would go to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), which, in an unprecedented partnership with the diplomatic community, led the successful campaign for the Treaty. The Prize was awarded in Oslo on December 10, 2017.
    But what is this Treaty? How and why did it arise? What is its historical significance? How could a small group of people succeed when so many others had failed? How do its signatories and proponents expect the Treaty to help prevent nuclear war and foster disarmament? Will it apply to the United States and the other nuclear weapon states who do not sign it?
How will it affect US alliances in Europe and the Western Pacific? How will it affect the New Mexico laboratories? What is the status of the Treaty today? And what can we do now to bring the Treaty into force and apply it here in the US and in New Mexico?
    Greg Mello will address these questions and any others you may have.
    Greg, with Trish Williams-Mello, his wife and co-worker, were active participants and presenters at (and between) the several fact-finding and negotiating fora that led to this Treaty over the 2014-2017 period. 




Greg Mello, Executive Director, is a co-founder of the Los Alamos Study Group and has led its varied activities since 1992, including policy research, environmental analysis, congressional education and lobbying, community organizing, litigation (FOIA, civil rights, NEPA), advertising, and the nuts and bolts of funding and running a small nonprofit. From time to time he has served as a consulting analyst, writer, and spokesperson for other nuclear policy organizations. Greg was educated as a systems engineer with a broad scientific background (Harvey Mudd College, 1971, with distinction) and as a regional planner with emphases in environmental planning and regional economics (Harvard, 1975, with distinction, HUD Fellow in Urban Studies). During the early 1980s Greg was a high school science and math teacher, then a hazardous waste inspector and statewide hazardous materials incident commander, and in the late 1980s a supervising hydrogeologist, for the New Mexico Environment Department. In 1984 Greg led the first regulatory enforcement at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In the early 1990s Greg was a consulting hydrologist in parallel with the early Study Group, with cleanup projects in New Mexico and California. In 2002, Greg was a Visiting Research Fellow at Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security. Greg’s research, analysis, and opinions have been published in the New York Times, Washington Post, The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Issues in Science and Technology, in the New Mexico press, and elsewhere. He has been interviewed thousands of times by U.S. and international news media (print, radio, and television). Greg’s research has been the source or impetus of many of these media articles and programs. In addition to speaking at hundreds of public meetings and events in New Mexico, Greg has been a guest speaker at several international disarmament events here and abroad. 

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

6th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, November 2nd at 5:30


Dr TerBeek has had to postpone his talk until sometime next Spring.
Our own Sarah Pratt from Explora is putting together some Chemistry Demos - see you in a few hours!

Dark Matter: Origins, Evidence and Why you Should Care

Russell TerBeek, Ph.D.
Physicist
Raytheon Albuquerque
As we look out into the night sky, it is tempting to think that the universe as we see it, as vast and magnificent as it is, could not possibly be any stranger.  But, back in the 1970s, physicists and astronomers began to suspect that all we could see couldn’t possibly be all there was.  In order to explain the behavior of galaxies, and even clusters of galaxies, some kind of stuff that clumped together and yet didn’t emit light – “dark matter” – needed to be thrown into the picture.  In fact, in order to fit the observational data, about four-fifths of all the matter in the universe would need to be “dark.”  For tonight’s talk, I’ll discuss the history of dark matter in astronomy, the ongoing search to find it on both astronomical and microscopic scales, some of the theories of what could make up this mysterious form of matter, and the experimental evidence so far.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

6th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, October 5th at 5:30

Caution: It may be a little shocking!

David Gibson
Museum Educator
National Museum of Nuclear Science & History

Our program will be on Electricity and the body: inside and out. Explore a few of the ways electricity affects the human body. Discover the "Skin Effect", Static, and controlling another person with your body's electricity.



David Gibson is the Museum Educator at the National Museum of Nuclear Science and history. He works to make science fun, engaging and memorable for all ages

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

6th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, September 7 at 5:30

Raman spectroscopy: A 90-year story of the intersection of science and technology

 
 
University of New Mexico
Professor
Chemical and Biological Engineering
Director
Center for Biomedical Engineering
 
A surgeon needs to determine the boundary between normal and diseased tissue. An art restorer needs to figure out what kinds of coatings were applied to an 18th century masterpiece over the last few centuries. A security officer needs to figure out if a powder contains explosives. A Food and Drug Administration inspector needs to determine if every tablet in a blister pack of imported pharmaceuticals was correctly manufactured. What do these situations have in common? They are all currently addressed using Raman spectroscopy. Early 2018 will mark the 90-year anniversary of the discovery of the Raman effect. The effect, named after its co-discoverer C.V. Raman, occurs when light passes through a transparent material and a very tiny fraction of the light changes color. The scientific community quickly recognized this result as a profound discovery, and Raman received a Nobel Prize only two years later. However, it’s taken 90 years of research and development for the technological impact of the discovery to begin to be fully realized. I will briefly discuss the Raman effect and Raman spectroscopy, and then describe the decades long path of discovery and technology development that has enabled the current widespread use of this method. The trajectory of Raman spectroscopy from its origin in fundamental science to applications in diverse fields spanning from medicine to art is a compelling story that illustrates how interactions between different areas of science and engineering can lead to technologies with broad societal impact.
 
 
 
 
 
Andrew P. Shreve is Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Director of the Center for Biomedical Engineering at UNM. His research interests include development of biosensors, optical instrumentation, and spectroscopy or modeling of energy and charge transfer in biological, nanomaterial and chemical systems. Amongst other topics, he has co-authored many scientific papers in the area of Raman spectroscopy, including experimental and theoretical studies of crystalline materials, carbon nanotubes, and proteins.