Wednesday, March 28, 2018

6th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, May 3rd at 5:30



Dark Matter: Origins, Evidence and Why you Should Care

Russell TerBeek, Ph.D.
Physicist
Raytheon Albuquerque
As we look out into the night sky, it is tempting to think that the universe as we see it, as vast and magnificent as it is, could not possibly be any stranger.  But, back in the 1970s, physicists and astronomers began to suspect that all we could see couldn’t possibly be all there was.  In order to explain the behavior of galaxies, and even clusters of galaxies, some kind of stuff that clumped together and yet didn’t emit light – “dark matter” – needed to be thrown into the picture.  In fact, in order to fit the observational data, about four-fifths of all the matter in the universe would need to be “dark.”  For tonight’s talk, I’ll discuss the history of dark matter in astronomy, the ongoing search to find it on both astronomical and microscopic scales, some of the theories of what could make up this mysterious form of matter, and the experimental evidence so far.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018


6th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, April 5th at 5:30


Afraid of Complex Environmental Systems? Surface Science: A New Hope



Investigation of environmental systems is often complex due to the simultaneous interaction of physical, chemical, and biological processes. However, most of these processes happen at the interface of water and solids which offer an opportunity to integrate conventional water chemistry techniques with advanced surface science tools. This conversation intends to motivate students and the general audience to recognize the invaluable opportunities that surface science tools offer to advance the current knowledge about the fate and transport of chemicals of concern in environmental systems.

Dr. Jose M. Cerrato

Assistant Professor

Department of Civil Engineering, UNM





Dr. Cerrato’s research interest is related to biogeochemical processes at the interface of water and energy that affect the cycle of metals and radionuclides in the environment. He leads the E-H2O Research Group which applies spectroscopy, microscopy, aqueous chemistry, and molecular biology tools for the study of complex environmental interactions.  Dr. Cerrato was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Washington University in St. Louis. He has been a recipient of the OAS-LASPAU-Fulbright Scholarship, National Science Foundation (NSF) Integrative Graduate Education Research Traineeship (IGERT), Oak Ridge Associated Universities Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award, the University of New Mexico Faculty of Color Research Award, and the NSF CAREER Award. 

In conjunction with the NMAVS Southwest Student Chapter