Thursday, September 19, 2019

8th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, October 3 at 5:30


 International Year of the Periodic Table

Sarah Pratt

Project Managerat Explora 



Join us on Thursday, October 3rd, to celebrate the International Year of the Periodic Table! Sarah Pratt, Project Manager at Explora, dives into a hands-on presentation on the history of the Periodic Table!


Sarah Pratt of Explora



Friday, August 23, 2019

8th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, September 5 at 5:30




 Fact vs Fiction in HBO's Chernobyl

Chris Perfetti

Assistant Professor
Dept of Nuclear Engineering
University of New Mexico 



HBO's recent "Chernobyl" mini-series delves into the history behind the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the most deadly nuclear power accident to ever occur, but how much of the series is accurate and how much is fictionalized?  Dr. Perfetti will discuss the fact VS fiction behind HBO's Chernobyl mini-series in hopes of demystifying the Chernobyl disaster and opening a dialog on nuclear reactor physics in an approachable (and beer-friendly) way.

Topic covered will include: the health effects of radiation exposure, radiation sickness, Nuclear Reactor Physics 101, the timeline of events at the Chernobyl disaster, and whether a "Chernobyl-like event" could ever occur in US nuclear reactors.


 Chris Perfetti



Tuesday, April 23, 2019

7th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, May 2 at 5:30




Extraterrestrial Botany: Fundamental Research and Inspirational Education

David T. Hanson

Professor
Biology
University of New Mexico 


Extended human space travel to Mars still sparks excitement in all demographics, and will become a reality within a decade, as will return trips to the moon. However, long missions will require growing plants in micro- and low-gravity, minimally for nutrition. Despite success with growing plants on the International Space Station (ISS), many hurdles remain for reliable production, and new scientific discoveries are made every mission. Our work growing plants on the ISS is mid-way through and I will share our most recent discoveries as well as highlight how we have been using our ISS experiments to excite 5th-9th grade students at Explora. Finally, we are starting new initiatives and will be seeking volunteers and other partnerships!


David Hanson is a UNM Professor of Biology and the Faculty Senate Research and Creative Works Council Chair. His research focuses on physiological, ecological, and energy-related aspects of photosynthesis in plants and algae, particularly elements of the carbon reactions. He is currently PI, co-PI, or senior personnel on five Federal awards totaling over $8.5M from NSF, DOE, ARPA-E, and NASA , including the first experiment in the new Advanced Plant Habitat on the International Space Station, results from which he will present at Science on Tap. He has advised 4 post-doctoral fellows, 9 PhD and 7 MS students,  provided research opportunities and mentoring for over 50 undergraduates (~60% women and 55% URM), and has over 50 peer-reviewed publications, and 2 pending patents. He is also an Associate Editor for the journal Photosynthesis Research, a 2014 Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow, a prior Panel Manager in the USDA AFRI Foundational Program, and is featured in the current issue of UNM's Alumni magazine. He is also the proud father of 11 year-old twins and is active in their Boy and Girl Scout activities as well as their soccer and competitive jump rope (yes Albuquerque has a team)!




Tuesday, March 26, 2019

7th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, April 11* at 5:30



Research and Casework in Forensic Anthropology and Bioarchaelogy


Amy Michael
Lecturer
Adjunct Instructor
Anthropology
University of New Hampshire  
 


Forensic anthropologists are uniquely suited to assist law enforcement solve complex and cold cases involving skeletonized human remains. As specialists in human osteology, forensic anthropologists can determine the age, sex, and ancestry from a set of human remains, determine if small fragments of bone are human or animal, and even identify human remains from plane crashes, fires, and other mass disasters. In this presentation, various typical (and atypical!) cases will be reviewed, with a focus on current research related to the effects of opioid abuse on human bone. Finally, the missing and murdered indigenous women and girls epidemic will be summarized from a forensic anthropology perspective.

Amy Michael is a biological anthropologist specializing in the investigation of human tooth and bone microstructure in an effort to answer questions about past and modern bodies. Using the principles of skeletal biology, Michael asks questions about health, pathology and age-at-death to better understand people in the past and present. With training in bioarchaeology, forensic anthropology and historical archaeology, Amy has worked on field projects in the United States, Belize and Albania. She is currently a senior staff member on the Central Belize Archaeological Survey project run through Michigan State University (www.anthropology.msu.edu/cbasproject). On this project, Michael’s role is to excavate and interpret a series of mortuary caves and rockshelters in Central Belize with a focus on addressing questions of social identity through the lens of mortuary variability. Michael is currently collaborating with researchers at Idaho State University, Michigan State University and the Ada County Coroner's Office (Boise, ID) on projects related to the examination of human rib microstructure to answer questions about age-at-death estimation in forensic cases, as well as the effects of opioid abuse on the accuracy of age-at-death estimations. Aside from a methods-based approach to forensic anthropology research, Michael is passionate about bringing a social justice perspective to her work on forensic cold cases. Michael spent six years working for the Michigan State University Campus Archaeology Program (campusarch.msu.edu) so she is also interested in historic archaeology and gendered landscapes of the past.



*April 11, 2019 (Note: 2nd Thursday of the month!)


May 2, 2019
David T. Hanson
Professor
UNM Biology
Research being conducted on the International Space Station involving plants

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

7th year of Science on Tap

Thanks to the continued support of UNM, Explora and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

 

 A time to eat, drink & talk about science!


on Central

Join us Thursday, March 7 at 5:30



Design Thinking with our Community

Heather Canavan
and the 
Canavan Group

Darnell Cuylear, Nika Mitchell, Tye Martin, Ben Matheson, Laura McKenney, Lorraine Mottishaw, Phuong Nguyen, Johnny Yarmey

Center for Biomedical Engineering
University of New Mexico

Although our public buildings and spaces have been required to “reasonably accommodate” individuals with disabilities since the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, many buildings are barely ADA-compliant, rather than ADA-friendly. For example, pushbuttons aides on heavy external building doors are often far too high for people with limited upper body mobility to operate from a wheelchair. Human-Centered Design is being used at the University of New Mexico to partner our engineering students with community members who know what the flaws are with our current assistive aides. Together, they are building creative designs that are tailor-made to adapt the environment to the user.


 At this event, you’ll hear a bit about the theory behind Design Thinking, and you’ll have a chance to participate in a hands-on event. Then you’ll see some of the latest designs, and meet the students behind them. 

For more information about the Canavan Group and Adaptive Biomedical Designs


Then mark your calendars for upcoming programs:

April 11, 2019 (Note: 2nd Thursday of the month!)
Research and Casework in Forensic Anthropology and Bioarchaeology
Amy Rachel Michael
Lecturer
Anthropology
University of New Hampshire 


May 2, 2019
David T. Hanson
Professor
UNM Biology
Research being conducted on the International Space Station involving plants